Kerala Police established a nursing home for trained dogs; an example of owners leaving their – The New Indian Express

Express Message Service

THRISSUR: Pet owners who abandon their aging or ailing canines on the street without a second thought, adding to the growing threat of stray dogs in the state, can certainly learn a lesson or two in compassion and respect from the Kerala Police Department.

Recognizing that everyone, human or animal, needs a good life in retirement, the Police Department have set up a retirement home at the Kerala Police Academy in Ramavarmapuram, Thrissur exclusively for trained dogs that were once part of the Kerala Police K9 unit . Surrounded by lush greenery and located in a secluded area, Vishranthi Retirement Home aims to provide all kinds of care, including medical care, to the dogs that have provided invaluable service.

“Previously, the retired dogs were given up for adoption to individuals or NGOs working for animal welfare. The practice was reviewed and the decision to set up a retirement home was made during Loknath Behera’s tenure as State Police Chief,” said Ramesh C, the SI in charge of Vishranthi. The decision was also made taking into account the possibility that the trained dogs would be used for anti-social activities.

Skills intact but dog health concern

Vishranthi opened in 2019 and has 17 inmates, all retired after serving in different districts. One of them is Max, 13, who served in Palakkad. A recipient of multiple awards given during various State and All India Police Service Meetings, Max lives a peaceful life in Vishranthi for her outstanding achievement.

Then there’s Tarzan, who has retired from Alappuzha after nine years of service. She has been part of the security detail for Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s visit to Kerala in the past. Though retired, the canines still retain their old charm and sniffing and tracking skills.

However, with age come problems. “Max suffers from age-related health problems. We closely monitor their health; Mannuthy vets examine them regularly. Although a veterinary clinic was recently set up here, it is not yet fully operational,” said a police officer who runs the retirement home with four other employees.

Tarzan is being treated for bone cancer. Once the clinic is fully operational, retired and training dogs will be able to receive medical assistance without having to leave the academy. IG (Training) K Sethuraman said, “The dogs in Vishranthi are doing well. When the home started there wasn’t enough space to walk the dogs. I have instructed the handlers to walk the dogs to the nearby compound.

As they are not as active as they used to be, the dogs are gaining weight which is a cause for concern.” He said the retirement home is managed with the academy fund and things have been smooth sailing so far. The handlers also take care of the hygiene and feeding habits of the dogs.

Maximum 10 years of service
According to a recent order from the state government, all trained police dogs are allowed to serve for 10 years. If they are in good health, they can serve an additional six months based on the Medical Association’s report. Dogs with health problems can be retired and sent to nursing homes for treatment.

THRISSUR: Pet owners who abandon their aging or ailing canines on the street without a second thought, adding to the growing threat of stray dogs in the state, can certainly learn a lesson or two in compassion and respect from the Kerala Police Department. Recognizing that everyone, human or animal, needs a good life in retirement, the Police Department have set up a retirement home at the Kerala Police Academy in Ramavarmapuram, Thrissur exclusively for trained dogs that were once part of the Kerala Police K9 unit . Surrounded by lush greenery and located in a secluded area, Vishranthi Retirement Home aims to provide all kinds of care, including medical care, to the dogs that have provided invaluable service. “Previously, the retired dogs were given up for adoption to individuals or NGOs working for animal welfare. The practice was reviewed and the decision to set up a retirement home was made during Loknath Behera’s tenure as State Police Chief,” said Ramesh C, the SI in charge of Vishranthi. The decision was also made taking into account the possibility that the trained dogs would be used for anti-social activities. Capabilities intact but dogs’ health is a concern Vishranthi opened in 2019 and has 17 inmates, all of whom have retired after serving in different districts. One of them is Max, 13, who served in Palakkad. A recipient of multiple awards given during various State and All India Police Service Meetings, Max lives a peaceful life in Vishranthi for her outstanding achievement. Then there’s Tarzan, who has retired from Alappuzha after nine years of service. She has been part of the security detail for Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s visit to Kerala in the past. Though retired, the canines still retain their old charm and sniffing and tracking skills. However, with age come problems. “Max suffers from age-related health problems. We closely monitor their health; Mannuthy vets examine them regularly. Although a veterinary clinic was recently set up here, it is not yet fully operational,” said a police officer who runs the retirement home with four other employees. Tarzan is being treated for bone cancer. Once the clinic is fully operational, retired and training dogs will be able to receive medical assistance without having to leave the academy. IG (Training) K Sethuraman said, “The dogs in Vishranthi are doing well. When the home started there wasn’t enough space to walk the dogs. I have instructed the handlers to walk the dogs to the nearby compound. As they are not as active as they used to be, the dogs are gaining weight which is a cause for concern.” He said the retirement home is managed with the academy fund and things have been smooth sailing so far. The handlers also take care of the hygiene and feeding habits of the dogs. Maximum 10 years of service According to the latest decree from the state government, all trained police dogs are allowed to serve for 10 years. If they are in good health, they can serve an additional six months based on the Medical Association’s report. Dogs with health problems can be retired and sent to nursing homes for treatment.

About Clayton Arredondo

Check Also

Walled Lake man who killed woman and dog sought mental health help days before attack, daughter says

QAnon conspiracy theories led man to kill wife, dog, daughter says One of the daughters …