University of Colorado, Denver: Find out more about our Latino four-legged friends


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In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, which falls from mid-September to mid-October, CU Denver has posted news profiles of some of our Latino Lynx on campus. Read our article on Chicano Art by Professor Quintin Gonzalez or read the book diary of Peer Advocate Leader Elena Deras Galdamez. In this article, just for fun, our new student author discusses dog breeds that originated in or were popularized in various Latin American countries. However, our articles on Hispanic Heritage Month focus on people and their cultures.

In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, which falls from mid-September to mid-October, CU Denver has posted news profiles of some of our Latino Lynx on campus. Read our article on Chicano Art by Professor Quintin Gonzalez or read the book diary of Peer Advocate Leader Elena Deras Galdamez. In this article, just for fun, our new student author discusses dog breeds that originated in or were popularized in various Latin American countries. However, our Hispanic Heritage Month articles focus on people and their cultures.

When you think of Latin American dog breeds, you might automatically think of a yapping Chihuahua that originated in Mexico. Well, Latin America includes Central America, South America, and many islands in the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico, and they are home to many beautiful breeds of dogs that you may not be familiar with.

The personalities of these animals can vary from social four-legged friends to herding dogs to loyal companions. Many of these dogs can make great lifelong partners for families or individuals. Of course, mixed breeds of dogs are wonderful too, and often combine some of the best traits from different breeds.

We probably all know something about the most popular Latin American dog breed. They are one of the oldest dog breeds that originated in Mexico and was developed by the Aztecs. With their compact bodies and short snouts, they are bursting with energy and lively personality. Your great canine energy is demonstrated through expressions and behavior.

Xoloitzcuintli

Xoloitzcuintli

Also known as Xolos, these are Mexican hairless dogs. It is pronounced “show-low-eats-QUEENT-lee”. They are another breed that can be traced back to the Aztecs. They are considered to be Mexico’s national dog. They are great watch dogs, just like Dante von coconut! Xolos from the same litter are hairy, partially or mixed hairy or completely hairless due to their hairlessness due to a genetic mutation.

coconut

Dogo Argentino

Dogo Argentino

Now it goes further south past Central America, to Argentina, where these dogs have their origin. They are strong dogs with many impressive traits. They are considered a relatively new breed of dog that wasn’t established until the 1920s. They are ideal for families with older children because they are loyal, protective, and patient. These dogs require plenty of exercise and social interaction on a daily basis.

Havanese

Havanese

Havanese, are the only breed of dog native to Cuba. They are happy little dogs with a stepping stone at every step. They may be small, but they have lively personalities. They are sociable companions who are also closely related to the Bichon Frize. While they may not require much room to roam, their flowing locks require time and maintenance. With their mischievous personalities, they are naturally extroverted.

Brazilian terrier

Brazilian terrier

They are descendants of a mix of Jack Russells, Parson Russells, Fox Terriers, and Chihuahuas. These hybrids are beautiful and highly intelligent. Full of dynamic energy, they love to end up playing for hours. These good-natured dogs are also great at catching vermin, a helpful talent in an agricultural powerhouse like Brazil.

Chilean Terrier

Chilean Terrier

Another beautiful mixed breed can be found in the country of Chile. They are rarely found outside of their home country. They are a mix of British Fox Terriers and Chilean dogs. They are considered balanced, elegant and family-friendly. Although they are on the smaller side, their fur coats are mainly white with black and brown markings.


This press release was produced by the University of Colorado, Denver. The views expressed here are your own.

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